6 Causes Why Your Vagina Burns After Sex

Ladies, we all know when our vagina is on the ‘fritz’. But, when pain, burning, and irritation come immediately after some good ol’ hanky panky, it’s not a good sign.

This burning feeling can be caused by quite a few, easily altered, things. At the top is your sexual hygiene as being part of the reasons why your vagina burns after sex. And let’s get into it and get to the bottom of these nasty burning sensations!

6 Possible Causes Why Your Vagina Burns After Sex   

1. Friction 

Too much friction during intimacy can literally rub things raw. Friction during sex can cause vaginal burning, especially if your vagina is not producing enough of its own lubrication. This can happen if you are not aroused enough before sex, or if you engage in specific sexual positions that cause more friction. (Plus, if we have razor burn… it’s over!)

Too much rubbing between body parts can lead to small tears in vaginal tissue. Grab some samples of different water-based lubricants and try out some optimal sex positions.


2. Lack of Arousal

If your partner mentions how “tight” you feel, this isn’t technically a good thing. We can understand why a man prefers a more constricted feel, but this is a sign that you aren’t aroused. Getting turned on will naturally cause your vagina to self-lubricate. Your personal lubricant’s favorite purpose is to make penetration enjoyable without friction. 

No matter how ‘lubed’ up you are, there will be no “hot dog down a hallway” feeling for your partner. You shouldn’t go straight to your partner’s attempt at turning you on if you feel a lack of arousal. Stress, medication, and hormonal imbalances can all affect a woman’s libido. 

Lack of Arousal


3. Infections

UTI

Infection of the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, bladder, ureters, and urethra, is called a urinary tract infection (UTI). Urinary tract infections are distinct from syphilis, candidiasis, and bacterial vaginosis, among others.

UTIs are most commonly caused by bacteria entering the urethra and multiplying in the urinary tract. Some common ways to get a UTI include:

1. Poor hygiene: Not wiping properly after using the toilet or wiping from back to front can introduce bacteria into the urethra.

2. Sexual activity: Sexual intercourse can introduce bacteria into the urethra, increasing the risk of a UTI.

3. Holding urine: Delaying urination can allow bacteria to multiply in the urinary tract.

4. Using irritating products: Certain personal care products such as harsh soaps, douches, or feminine hygiene sprays can irritate the urethra and increase the risk of infection.

5. Urinary catheters: Having a urinary catheter inserted can introduce bacteria into the urinary tract.


Yeast Infection

A yeast infection, also known as candidiasis, is a common fungal infection that can affect the vagina. An overgrowth of the fungus Candida causes it. Yeast infections are not considered sexually transmitted infections.

Causes include:

1. Moist and warm environments: Yeast thrives in warm and moist environments, so factors like tight clothing, sweaty workouts, or staying in wet swimsuits for prolonged periods can contribute to yeast infections.

2. Antibiotics: The use of antibiotics can disrupt the natural balance of bacteria in the vagina, allowing yeast to multiply.

3. Hormonal changes: Fluctuations in hormone levels, such as those that occur during pregnancy, menstrual cycles, or hormone therapy, can increase the risk of yeast infections.

4. Weakened immune system: A weakened immune system due to illnesses like diabetes, HIV/AIDS, or certain medications can increase susceptibility to yeast infections.

Antifungal drugs, either over-the-counter or recommended by a doctor, are the standard treatment for yeast infections. Creams, suppositories, and oral pills are all potential delivery mechanisms for these drugs. Just whatever you do, don’t douche. 

Yeast Infection


Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs):

Sexually transmitted infections, also known as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), are infections that are passed from one person to another through sexual contact. There are numerous types of STIs caused by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi. 

Causes include:

1. Unprotected sex: Engaging in vaginal, anal, or oral sex without using barrier methods such as condoms or dental dams can increase the risk of transmitting or acquiring STIs. To avoid a messy bacteria outbreak, refrain from switching between anal and vaginal sex.

2. Multiple or new sexual partners: Having multiple sexual partners or engaging in sexual activity with a new partner can increase the chances of encountering STIs. Not just because you are out there doing your thing, it’s sometimes due to a man’s basic pH balance which throws our acidic pH out of whack and can make our vaginas taste sour


Bacterial Vaginosis

The imbalance of vaginal bacteria is the root cause of bacterial vaginosis (BV), a frequent vaginal illness. Although the likelihood of contracting BV increases with sexual activity, it is not classified as an STI.

Causes include:

1. Imbalance of vaginal bacteria: The vagina normally balances different bacteria. When the balance is disrupted, harmful bacteria will overgrow. Especially when you start to see a yogurt-like or chunky discharge, this is a good sign there is some uninvited bacteria in your vagina.

2. Douching: The practice of douching can interfere with the natural balance of bacteria in the vagina and increase the risk of BV. Find out how to detox your vagina here.

3. IUD use: Some studies suggest that using intrauterine devices (IUDs) for contraception may increase the risk of developing BV, although there isn’t enough factual evidence that this is 100% true. 

IUD


4. Vaginal Dryness

As you age, estrogen levels drop causing dryness that lube can’t fix. Hormone therapy may help alongside moisturizers and lubricants.   

Menstrual Cycle

Some women may experience vaginal burning during or after their menstrual cycle due to hormonal fluctuations. Increased sensitivity and inflammation of the vaginal tissues can contribute to this discomfort. Maintaining good hygiene, using gentle menstrual products, and practicing proper genital care can help reduce symptoms.


Hormonal Contraception

Birth control pills and hormonal intrauterine devices (IUDs) are two examples of hormonal contraceptives that may have an effect on vaginal lubrication and contribute to vaginal dryness. Burning sensations may occur during or after sexual activity due to this dryness. 


Childbirth and Nursing

After childbirth, our hormones fluctuate, and tissue trauma can cause vaginal soreness, dryness, and burning sensations. Breastfeeding can also contribute to hormonal changes that affect our vaginal lubrication. Like the lactation isn’t enough on its own. 


Menopause

Because, you know, hot flashes, forgetting everything, mood swings, and our sleep schedule are all out of whack. We might as well throw in some first to our vaginas! Vaginal atrophy, or the weakening and drying of the vaginal walls, is a common symptom of menopause. Sexual and urinary sensations, including burning and pain, have been linked to vaginal atrophy.


Hormonal Disorders

Certain hormonal disorders, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or thyroid disorders, can affect hormonal balance and potentially contribute to vaginal discomfort, including burning sensations. Treating the underlying hormonal condition in consultation with a healthcare professional may help alleviate symptoms.


5. Allergies

Common culprits include latex condoms, spermicidal lubricants, fragranced soaps, and laundry detergent. Switch to hypoallergenic products and natural fibers.  

Allergy Medications

Some allergy medications, such as antihistamines or decongestants, can cause vaginal dryness, which may lead to a burning sensation during sex. Having a stuffy nose and sore throat makes you feel like crap. Taking allergy medications and having sex is kind of like the cure-all, right? If you experience this side effect, consult your healthcare provider to explore alternative medications or additional measures to manage vaginal dryness.


Sperm

Some individuals may have an allergic reaction to components of sperm, such as proteins or enzymes, which can lead to vaginal burning, itching, or swelling. This condition is known as seminal plasma hypersensitivity. Using barrier methods, such as condoms, can help prevent direct contact with sperm and alleviate symptoms.


Condoms

Thank you for participating in safe sex! On the negative side of it, some condoms may cause an allergic reaction mainly if you are already allergic to latex or the lubricants used on condoms.  Using non-latex condoms or condoms made from alternative materials can help prevent allergic reactions.


Sex Toys

Some sex toys, especially those made from certain materials, may contain allergens or irritants that can cause vaginal burning or irritation. Using sex toys made from body-safe materials, cleaning them properly, and using adequate lubrication can help reduce the risk of discomfort or allergic reactions. Look for ‘non-porous’ or 100% silicone toys. These are made to be easily washed and make it nearly impossible for bacteria to build up in the nooks and crannies. 


Soap

Harsh soaps or cleansers can disrupt the natural pH balance of the vagina, leading to vaginal irritation, dryness, and burning sensations. Using mild, fragrance-free soaps or specifically formulated intimate cleansers can help maintain vaginal health and reduce discomfort. As much as it may be tempting to splurge on the pretty bottles at the store claiming to be the ‘feminine cleanse’ your vagina needs…. Keep walking.


Lubricants

Some individuals may be sensitive or allergic to certain lubricants, which can cause vaginal burning or irritation. Choosing water-based or hypoallergenic lubricants can help minimize the risk of adverse reactions. Try to stay away from flavored lubes and ones that have heating and cooling effects. 


6. Skin Conditions

Skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis can affect the vulva and cause vaginal burning, itching, or soreness. In order to manage these conditions, a healthcare professional may prescribe topical medications or emollients.

Vaginismus

It is a condition where the vaginal muscles spasm involuntarily, making penetration difficult or painful. These spasms can lead to vaginal discomfort or even burning. Many victims of sexual abuse develop this condition due to the traumatic event. 

A lot of women report the sensation as burning or pressure, similar to when the penis hits a barrier. Vaginismus sufferers may also encounter bleeding. However, the discomfort is not restricted to sexual intercourse alone. It is common to feel pain or discomfort while using a tampon or undergoing pelvic exams.


Vulvodynia

This Jurassic-sounding term refers to chronic vulvar pain without an identifiable cause. This condition can involve symptoms such as burning, stinging, or soreness in the vulva, including the vaginal area. Seeking medical evaluation from a healthcare professional specializing in vulvar disorders can help determine appropriate management strategies, which may include topical treatments, physical therapy, or counseling. 

There is no way to ‘physically’ notice vulvodynia, but if you are wondering why your vagina burns after sex, along with feeling sore outside the vagina and your vulva, schedule that date with your gyno. 


FAQs 

Is it normal for my vagina to burn after sex?

While some mild discomfort or burning sensation can be normal due to increased friction or sensitivity, persistent or intense burning after sex may indicate an underlying issue. It’s important to seek medical advice to rule out any infections or conditions that may require treatment.


Can allergies cause a burning sensation in my vagina after sex?

Yes, allergies to certain substances such as latex condoms, spermicides, lubricants, or personal hygiene products can cause vaginal burning after sex. If you suspect an allergic reaction, try switching to hypoallergenic alternatives and consult with a healthcare professional if symptoms persist.


Are infections a common cause of vaginal burning after sex?

Yes, throughout this article we mentioned that infections like yeast infections, urinary tract infections (UTIs), bacterial vaginosis, or sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can cause vaginal burning after sex.


Can hormonal changes contribute to a burning sensation in my vagina after sex?

Hormonal changes, such as those occurring during menopause or fluctuations in estrogen levels, can lead to vaginal dryness and increased sensitivity, resulting in a burning sensation after sex. Discussing your symptoms with a healthcare professional can help determine if hormone therapy or other treatments may be beneficial.


What should I do if I experience vaginal burning after sex?

Well, it looks like you might have Googled it first. That’s great! Now, phone up your gyno. They can evaluate your symptoms, perform any necessary tests or examinations, and provide appropriate guidance and treatment options based on the underlying cause. 


Final Thoughts

Ladies, sex should be enjoyable, pleasurable, and feel great! There are times where we experience discomfort after a freaky session. But, if there is a burning sensation, your vagina is letting you know that something got in there that shouldn’t be. This can simply be just bad bacteria or even an allergic reaction.

Make sure you are lubed up and get yourself to the bathroom for a pee break immediately afterwards. (Ok, lay there and catch your breath first)

SHARE THIS POST

You May Also Like

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

4 × 1 =